Blog

Review: After Life

After Life
After Life by Simon Funk
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Interesting chronicle of the human race evolution into machines. Didn’t see that ending coming.

View all my reviews

H2G2: making humor from science

This is a presentation I did in 2012 for an internal “Inspiration Meet” at a previous workplace, where we shared any book, movie, or whatever inspires us. I gave a presentation about Hitchhiker’s Guide to The Galaxy, the science fiction book and series by the late Douglas Adams, focusing on how he invented humorous fictional concepts and technologies based on existing science and philosophy.

The presentation went fairly well, except when I attempted to explain about the Infinite Improbability Drive. One of the audience actually fell asleep. :)) Here I added a video from the H2G2 movie which I should’ve included then. Enjoy!

Eyes looking to the sky

This is from an old TED talk by French artist J.R. He painted the roofs in a slum in Kenya; an art project which grew into the Inside Out Project.

When IE screws up your PHP session…

This line of code will save you. Respect and cherish it. And put it on the first line of your scripts:

header('P3P:CP="IDC DSP COR ADM DEVi TAIi PSA PSD IVAi IVDi CONi HIS OUR IND CNT"');

The issue that this header solves usually happens when the session is started within an iframe, e.g. when building a Facebook app. It has something to do with Internet Explorer not trusting iframe content.

Anyway, P3P stands for Platform for Privacy Preferences. You can also Google that code to find out more.

Happy Pi Day!

Happy Pi Day! In case you’re wondering why, it’s because

March 14 => 3-14 => 3.14

Of course, only Chuck Norris knows the last digit of pi. But for the rest of us, there’s a website that shows pi to 1 million decimal places. The URL of the site itself shows the first 64 digits of pi: 3.141592653589793238462643383279502884197169399375105820974944592.com

Have a blast and some Pi Pie!

I wrote this post in E-Prime.

Today I learned about a modified form of English called E-Prime, which disallows the usage of “to be” verbs. According to some scholars, E-Prime helps to “clarify thinking and strengthen writing” by ensuring that each sentence has a clear subject and avoiding multiple possible meanings which might result from the use of “to be” forms.

I find writing in E-Prime quite challenging, especially since I use passive sentences a lot. For example, you can see my conversion of the Rifleman’s Creed below.
Continue reading